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Trauma therapy and PTSD treatment can help

When you’re tired of reliving the past, feeling depressed, or feeling on edge, treating your trauma can be life-changing.

 

 

 

Trauma therapy and PTSD treatment can help

When you’re tired of reliving the past, feeling depressed, or feeling on edge, treating your trauma can be life-changing.

Trauma therapy helps with

Feeling on edge

Reliving trauma

Difficulty sleeping

Emotional numbing

Difficulty controlling emotions

Image of two children reading together on the floor. This image depicts how children may behave while waiting to meet with a trauma therapist for trauma therapy in New York City. 10001 | 10002City.
Image of a group of people sitting on a log on a beach eating watermelon. This image depicts how people may interact after sessions with a trauma therapist for PTSD treatment in New York City. 10010 | 10011

Trauma therapy and PTSD treatment works

Over 50% of people experience at least one trauma in their lives. Some of these people go on to experience either short- or long-term effects of that trauma. And if untreated, the effects of trauma can persist throughout one’s life. Trauma therapy and PTSD treatment can decrease or even eliminate symptoms, providing freedom from the confines of trauma.

 

Image of three people walking together down an alley. This image demonstrates the friendships folks can develop after PTSD treatment in New York City with a trauma therapist. | 10005 | 10003

Trauma therapy helps with

Feeling on edge

Reliving trauma

Difficulty sleeping

Emotional numbing

Difficulty controlling emotions

Image of two young boys reading a book together. This image illustrates what a waiting room to meet with a trauma therapist in New York City may look like. | 10018 | 11103
Image of a group of friends sitting and eating watermelon together at the beach. This image represents the relationships you can form after trauma therapy in New York City. Start meeting with a trauma therapist! | 10001 | 10002

Trauma therapy and PTSD treatment works

Over 50% of people experience at least one traumatic event in their lives. Some of these people go on to experience either short- or long-term effects of that trauma. And if untreated, the effects of trauma can persist throughout one’s life. Trauma therapy and PTSD treatment can decrease or even eliminate symptoms, providing freedom from the confines of trauma.

 

Image of three students sitting together in a park and working in journals and laptops. This image represents how young adults can benefit from working with an ADHD therapist in ADHD treatment in New York City. 10003 | 10002 | 10001

FAQs about trauma & PTSD

Was what I experienced considered a “trauma"?

Many people discount their own experiences. They tell themselves “it could have been worse,” or that their experience doesn’t actually count as a “trauma.” But when discounted, the effects of trauma grow and affect your mind, body, and overall life in countless damaging ways. It’s important to first recognize trauma for what it is.

Trauma can occur in many different forms. Traumatic events can range from serious injury, sexual violence, natural disasters, serious community-wide events (like COVID), and life-threatening events. It can also be chronic abuse and neglect, frequent invalidation, being a parentified child (taking on adult responsibilities), being bullied, or racial or community trauma. The traumatic event can be either something you have experienced or witnessed. Intergenerational trauma may not be witnessed, but exists as the psychological or emotional effects that can be experienced by people who live with people who have experienced trauma. Coping and adaptation patterns developed in response to trauma can be passed from one generation to the next.

What are the symptoms of PTSD?

The key symptoms of PTSD include intrusive thoughts, memories or flashbacks, avoidance of reminders of the event, changes in mood and thoughts (for instance, “No one can be trusted,” or “I am a bad person,”), and changes in the level of reactivity (feeling on edge or in a state of hyperarousal). PTSD is underdiagnosed so many people do not know they are experiencing PTSD. Even when someone may not have all the symptoms of PTSD and may not “meet the criteria” for it, trauma can still cause enough symptoms to interfere significantly in one’s life.

Common psychological symptoms associated with trauma include sleep disturbance and nightmares, irritability, anger, interpersonal conflict, intrusive memories and thoughts, withdrawal and avoidance, emotional numbness, disorientation and helplessness, anxiety and panic, self-blame, and self-loathing, and hypervigilance. Common physical signs and symptoms of trauma include racing heart, headaches, stomachaches, obesity, respiratory difficulties (like asthma), drug and alcohol problems, and chronic medical and mental illness.

What is complex trauma?

Complex trauma occurs when traumatic events occur repeatedly throughout one’s life. Each event itself may not be sufficient by itself to have mounted a trauma response. However, the collective experience of the repeated insults cause significant physiological and psychological changes of trauma. Not always, but often, complex trauma begins in childhood and can disrupt many aspects of a child’s development and the formation of a cohesive self. Complex trauma falls under the umbrella of PTSD. But, because it often occurs during important developmental windows and often involves a caregiver or intimate partner, its effects can be even more far-reaching. 

What should I expect when working on my trauma in therapy?

Starting trauma therapy and PTSD treatment doesn’t mean that you have to go right in and begin discussing your trauma. Actually, in many cases, if you begin therapy by focusing on the trauma itself, the experience may worsen injury and pain. Instead, the early work of therapy should focus instead on restoring a sense of safety, helping the individual discover and use their own resources, learning new coping skills, and practicing self-regulation.

After initial trust is established between the therapist and client AND the individual has a heightened awareness of their coping resources, then therapy can begin to use strategies that deal directly with recounting the trauma story. Carefully integrating the trauma story only when the client is ready reduces the odds that discussing the trauma will cause emotional flooding and re-traumatization. Still, talking about trauma is difficult. It’s normal to experience some level of distress and difficulty coping during the process. But working with a trauma therapist can help you get through the experience, process your trauma, and begin to make changes in your life. 

Do treatment approaches differ for BIPOC and LGBTQIA*+ folks?

For BIPOC and LGBTQIA*+ folks, it’s important to work with a therapist who is well-versed in the effects of discrimination, inequity, and oppression. They should be able to competently discuss racism, racial trauma, cultural issues, and historical and intergenerational trauma. For certain groups who have experienced many levels of trauma, the intersections of those traumas must be clearly realized and processed. It is a priority at our New York City practice to take a very intersectional approach to both identities and trauma because without such an approach, therapy is often insufficient.

Get started with trauma therapy and PTSD treatment in New York City today!

We have a skilled set of mental health professionals at our practice located in New York City. From psychiatrists to trauma therapists, we are ready to support your mental health needs. With a trauma-informed approach, we treat a variety of conditions including ASD, bipolar disorder, anxiety, depression, and psychosis. Additionally, many of our team members are able to provide psychiatric consultations to ensure we provide you the most well-rounded care. Schedule a session with us to see if we are the right for for you!